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25 Mile Market

Providing

Ultra Local 

Agriculture

Harvest Time

September 20th

This week's Baskets may have included:

Cucumbers

Kale Medley

Purple Bell Pepper

Green Beans

Royal Burgundy Beans

Mesclun Lettuce Mix

Yellow Zucchini

Patty Pan Squash

Green Zucchini

Italian Plums

Red Raspberries

Broccoli

Hakuri Turnips

Beets (Golden or Red)

Red Gem Corn

Herbs de Provence

Delicata Squash

Tomatoes

Huckleberries

Basil

Apples

Jalepenos

 
































September 6th

This week's Baskets may have included:

Cucumbers

Kale Medley

Purple Bell Pepper

Green Beans

Royal Burgundy Beans

Mesclun Lettuce Mix

Yellow Zucchini

Patty Pan Squash

Green Zucchini

Italian Plums

Red Raspberries

Broccoli

Hakuri Turnips

Beets (Golden or Red)

Red Gem Corn

Herbs de Provence

Delicata Squash

Tomatoes

Huckleberries

Basil


































































August 23rd 

This weeks Baskets may have included:

Cucumbers

Kale Medley

Purple Bell Pepper

Black Nebula Carrots

Nantes Carrots

Green Beans

Royal Burgundy Beans

Mesclun Lettuce Mix

Yellow Zucchini

Patty Pan Squash

Green Zucchini

Cherry Plums

Italian Plums

Red Raspberries

Baby Broccoli

Hakuri Turnips

Beets (Golden or Red)













































August 17th 

This weeks Baskets may have included:

Cucumbers

Kale Medley

French Breakfast Radishes

Purple Bell Pepper

Black Nebula Carrots

Nantes Carrots

Green Beans

Royal Burgundy Beans

Snap peas

Shelling Peas

Mesclun Lettuce Mix

Purple Spinach (Red Orach)

Yellow Zucchini

Patty Pan Squash

Green Zucchini

Cherry Plums

Italian Plums

Red Raspberries

Baby Broccoli

Hakuri Turnips

Beets (Golden or Red)




















































August 9th:

This Week's baskets may have included:

Cucumbers

Kale

Tomatillos

Garlic

French Breakfast Radishes

Golden Beets

Green Beans

Royal Burgundy Beans

Sweet Peas

Nantes Carrots

Denver Carrots

Black Nebula Carrots

Black Berries

Raspberries

Blueberries

Dill

Kale (Purple, blue and leafy)

Hakuri turnips

Salad greens

Rhubarb

Goodies and Recipes - Week of September 20, 2020

Your weekly guide to your basket + Thoughts from our Farmers

Farmer Lindsey's Kale Chips

Kale

Avocado Oil

Salt

Thyme

Garlic Powder

Preheat oven to 225

Wash and dry kale completely then tear into small pieces

Toss kale with avocado oil

Spread evenly over cookie sheet so the pieces aren't touching each other and sprinkle on seasonings

Bake 20-25 minutes. Kale burns easily and will crisp even more when taken out.

A Change of Seasons

Guest Post by Lindsey D.,

September 20, 2020

It is impossible for me to choose a favorite season, but I truly do love the fall. I love the seed pods from the wildflowers and the fog in the valley. I love planting a new round of seedlings and watching my cold weather crops flourish. I love the need to wear my favorite scarf and my cup of coffee is even more welcome on a crisp autumn morning. I love the ebb and flow of the seasons, the succession of new beginnings and the way the way green plants fade away at different times, like nature is slowly going to sleep.

The end of summer has looked a little different this year, the smoke draping the west coast and sequestering us indoors. My children were climbing the couches, wrestling on the beds, and driving me absolutely crazy. I longed to get into the garden, there is so much to get done. I longed to step onto the back porch (away from my squabbling children) and take a deep breath of fresh air. To be isolated from nature really was a little too much to bear after this long and insufferable year.

My stoic husband has reminded me that by experiencing this discomfort and inconvenience we are better able to appreciate and truly value what we have. As I revel in the very air we breath, I must admit, he has a point... Just don't tell him that...

As I watered my garden tonight I looked out at the clear skies, the changing leaves, my beautiful fall plant babies, and I took stock of what I have taken for granted. I thought about what I had, right there in that moment- fresh air, land not ravaged by fire, precious family, true good friends, and the hope inspired by watching new plants germinate and thrive.

My life is quite different this September than last. And the truth is, I kind of like it. Losing my job in March led me to this. To growing and providing food. Last September I was checking out books from the library about small scale farms, this year I am living that dream. Life is ineffable- the devastation, the surprises, the moments of beauty. This year has been all of those things and as the summer fades to fall, I am going to try to adopt a stoic mindset and seek to be content, satisfied, and grateful... Just don't tell my husband I am taking his advice...

Goodies and Recipes - Week of September 6, 2020

Your weekly guide to your basket + Thoughts from our Farmers

Lindsey's Herb de Provence Potato Roast

Herbs de Provence Potatoes

-Yukon Gold Potatoes

-Olive Oil

-Garlic (minced)

-Herbs de Provence (minced)

-Salt

Preheat Oven to 450. Chop potatoes into 1/2 inch chunks.

Put potatoes into a bowl and toss with about 2 tablespoons olive oil, minced garlic, and minced herbs.

Spread potatoes onto cookie sheet in single layer and sprinkle with salt.

Roast for 25-30 minutes until golden and tender.


Under the Cucumber Tree

Guest Post by Kate J. P Wolfe,

September 7, 2020

There's a place in my garden where vines, canes and branches converge in a tangle. It's my favorite place in my garden - raspberries entangled in the branches of the apple tree, hanging heavy with apples and cucumbers. That's right - I said cucumbers. My healthy cucumber plants chose to grow beyond the trellis my 10-year-old son made and into the apple tree, who it seems, was a willing participant in the creation of my favorite garden spot. The apple tree seemed to lean down to the cucumber vines as the apples grew heavy and whisper, "Hey, Cucumber - I have a hilarious idea." The Cucumber encircled the willing apple tree branches and climbed into it without hesitation. My cucumber-apple tree was born! I love every part of this. To me, it's symbolic of letting nature do her work. All of the plants are healthy, productive and continue to thrive in this setting. This corner of my garden is confusing, exciting and needs no fixing or explanation because everything is healthy and thriving.

I recently had a garden guest and I watched their face scan my growing fields with confusion and a touch of disbelief. I'm not sure what they expected, but I got the feeling that my growing spaces were not what they were expecting. After some time, they began giving me advice on how to better grow a cleaner space. "You see those weeds are going to start choking out other things" they said as they pointed to my intentionally overgrown patch of Pennsylvania smartweed. I looked at the patch they were pointing to and saw my thriving cabbage, huge sweet onions, kale, volunteer tomatoes and huge beautiful medicinal herbs. As we walked through the rest of my growing fields, they continued "You should prune this plant like this....You should make this tree do this....you should....you should.....".

I recently had a garden guest who came with no expectations. I watched as their eyes scanned my growing spaces with wonder and open mouth. "This. is. enchanting!" they exclaimed as they zoomed from one garden bed to the next, exuding child-like excitement. They would carefully touch the growing leaves and soak in the gifts that each plant was offering. I watched as their energy grew into a natural peace, seeing all of my growing plants. As we walked under my raspberries I said "And through the raspberry jungle..." and they stayed in the jungle for two seconds longer to soak up the wild.

The wild is nothing to control - I can commiserate with that. Maybe that is why I feel comfort from the idea of the cucumber tree. Wild will win every single time. When wild is controlled, it often dies with the constraints strangling out the essence of what wild actually is. So, to the garden guests who come and "you should" my wild, thank you for your opinion - I'm going to let my wild be free. 



Goodies and Recipes - Week of August 23, 2020

Your weekly guide to your basket + Thoughts from our Farmers

Lindsey's Hakurei Turnip Stir Fry

Ingredients:

Butter

Hakurei Turnips with 5 green leaves reserved

2-4 Kale leaves

Mushrooms

Garlic

Pinch of flake salt

Recipe:

Mince garlic, wash and chop turnips, greens, mushrooms, and kale.

Sauté turnip roots in butter for 4 minutes.

Add mushrooms and garlic and sauté until soft.

Add kale and turnip greens, cover and cook for 2 minutes.

Kale is full of vitamins that are fat soluble. So top with more butter and a pinch of flake sea salt!

These tasty little plums are great for cooking, often being made into preserves, fruit leathers and chutneys.  They are also a tasty bitesized snack eaten fresh!

Cherry plums are a good source of potassium, calcium, phosphate, vitamin C and B complex vitamins which have a great importance to the process of metabolism and nervous system health. 



You are a Super Hero

Guest Post by Lindsey D.,

August 23, 2020


I wrote a thesis my sophomore year in college trying to solve world hunger.

It didn't start out that way. It was originally about genetically modified foods, but as my fall quarter came to a close I was in a tangle of research about the global food system and was really, really angry.

It would be hard to condense the research into this post but suffice it to say global food insecurities are caused by a for profit apparatus that systematically displaces, destroys, poisons, and starves people all over the world. Huge corporations like Con-Agra and Monsanto play a part, as well as the World Trade Organization and IMF. The audacities and tragedies are overwhelming. Since I had just gotten back from Africa and had held babies with distended stomachs and knew their names- I was red-hot-crying-mad.

I spent most of the winter quarter cataloging and defining the very many problems that start with the current global food system and end with people starving all over the world.

Then, the solution became clear, obvious even- grow your own food! If you can't do that, buy your food locally. It solves all the problems in one go, an elegant solution... It turns out I wasn't the only one with that idea!

I am now a mom that buys my groceries at Costco and has a budget I have to hit. My kids eat mac and cheese and I don't know where my current flour came from. Which means it is quite possibly from Con-Agra. I do not have the same clear-eyed view of the "simple" solution, but I still know that the best way to combat some of the biggest issues of our time- global warming, food security, health, and the economy- really truly is by buying local food.

By buying local food you are creating food security in Olalla, Fox Island, and Gig Harbor in a time of a global pandemic; you are supporting people in your community, not corporations that place profit over human beings; you are reducing the environmental impact of your food exponentially, as well as creating community, eating seasonally, and getting the freshest food (picked every Sunday morning), that have nutrients and flavor that cannot be beat!

So, thanks for helping us solve world hunger. My idealistic 20-year-old self thinks you're pretty great.



Goodies and Recipes - Week of August 17, 2020

Your weekly guide to your basket + Thoughts from our Farmers

Cherry Plums

These tasty little plums are great for cooking, often being made into preserves, fruit leathers and chutneys.  They are also a tasty bitesized snack eaten fresh!

Cherry plums are a good source of potassium, calcium, phosphate, vitamin C and B complex vitamins which have a great importance to the process of metabolism and nervous system health. 


Cherry Plum Fruit Leather

Cherry Plums

1 tsp Lemon juice

2 TBS Water

3 TBS Sugar 


Rinse, pit and chop plums. Put in saucepan and cook with  other ingredients, for 10 minutes. Take off heat and puree.  Pout into cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.  Place in oven on lowest setting possible.  Keep in oven for 6-10 hours.  Fruit leather is done when it is no longer sticky on top.  


Nature Heals

Guest Post by Kate J. Island Cove Apothecary and (f)arm 

August 17th, 2020

I have always loved the idea of natural healing methods.  When I was a young child I would often grind berries, grass and leaves together to make potions and medicines that I imagined would heal scrapes, bruises and ailments. It was based solely in what I felt like grinding up, not on fact or research. I knew that nature had healing abilities.  This is not unique, by any means - I often see children doing the same thing, as though it is some sort of innate knowledge that plants can heal.  

Plants have healed me over and over again - emotionally and physically.  They heal bad days, they heal bad arguments, they heal the general funk we can all find ourselves in. Communing with plants brought me back.

I began learning about herbology as I was going through midwifery school.  It awoke that innate, childhood magic of potion making and I have never stopped making and learning herbal and botanical methods for healing. I can heal eczema, burns and bruises all with the power of plants that I grow in my garden and that's just the beginning.  Nature has a way of healing all that we need healed. Thank you nature, for healing!


Herbal/ Botanical Salve

This isn't a recipe, but more of an answer to "What is this stuff?".  The salve that is in the Apothecary Starter kit that you may have received in your August Box is a fix-all for any skin condition.  It works great for new tattoos, small scrapes and abrasions. Using powerful botanicals like calendula, chamomile and rose help skin heal. Also antimicrobial, calendula and tea tree oil work together to keep small abrasions germ free. Or - if you have dry cracked knuckles, like this gardener, this salve will fix it overnight!  Enjoy the healing!



Goodies and Recipes August 9th, 2020

Your weekly guide to your basket + Thoughts from our Farmers

Patty Pan Squash

 This heirloom variety was given it's name in the 17th century for it's scalloped edges and resemblance to the fluted edges of cakes of the day. It is a delicious summer squash with a mildly sweet flavor.  Eaten raw it makes a delicious snack, but roasted or grilled makes it a delicious addition to summer cuisine! Use it like you would a zucchini and you will see how delicious this pretty little squash can be!


Simple Grilled Patty Pan 

(Kate Style Recipe)

Patty Pan squash

Olive Oil

Salt

Garlic powder

Pepper

Wash and cube Patty Pan. Toss in all of the other ingredients. Put cubes of oiled and seasoned Patty Pan on skewers.  Grill over high heat for just a few minutes, turning and watching carefully until desired squash-doneness. Take care to not burn yourself as you scarf the deliciousness. Enjoy!


Waning Gibbous, Illumination 70%.  AND options for basket ingredients

Guest Post by Kate J. Island Cove Apothecary and (f)arm 

August 9th, 2020

The moon is an im​portant part of farming.  It has been used for thousands of years as a guide for planting, for harvesting and for guiding farmers in their practices.  Some folklore even speaks to harvesting under the full moon for better flavor value.  August 9th's moon was in the waning gibbous, with illumination of 70%.

     I always abide by the moon's schedule. I find the pull of the moon to be soothing and I always feel like I know where I'm at if I know where the moon is at.  I often harvest under the full moon and plant under a new moon - it's not rooted in anything but what feels right.  Maybe it's an ancestral farmer hand-down, or maybe it's just that it's the only time that I can listen fully to the moon and the earth without the calling of children, or the ring of the phone, or the barking of dogs.  Perhaps it's that I can be under the moon with my hands in the dirt, barefoot with dew dripping from my ankles feeling the earth supporting all of me.  For whatever reason it may be, it's how I've gardened for years and years and how I'll continue to work the earth.     ~Kate J., Island Cove Apothecary and (f)arm.


Kate's Tomatillo Salsa Verde 

(Kate Style Recipe)

6-10 tomatillos

1/2 of a white onion

2 cloves (or more or less) garlic 

1 Handful cilantro leaves

1 large squeeze of lime juice

 1-2 Jalapeño peppers,   serrano peppers, stemmed, seeded and chopped (you can use whole for more heat if you want)

Salt to taste


Toss into a food processor and pulse until desired consistency.  ENJOY!